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The role of MEC-17/αTAT1 in nervous system integrity and repair

thesis
posted on 24.11.2020, 02:44 by JEAN - SEBASTIEN KWOH Z TEOH
Neurons extend cable-like axons throughout the body to communicate with each other and other cells. Keeping these axons intact is critical for our nervous system’s function. In fact, disruptions to axons are associated with many human disorders, which are frequently incurable because our body lacks effective repair mechanisms. In this thesis, we have studied internal structures in axons, known as microtubules. We discovered that two microtubule-associated proteins are required to prevent the axon structure from degrading and to repair itself. Our findings add to our understanding of how neurons can keep their axons intact and repair themselves when injured.

History

Principal supervisor

Brent Neumann

Additional supervisor 1

Liesbet Temmerman

Year of Award

2020

Department, School or Centre

Anatomy and Developmental Biology

Additional Institution or Organisation

Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute

Campus location

Australia

Course

Doctor of Philosophy

Degree Type

DOCTORATE

Exports

Categories

Exports