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A systems biology approach indicates novel triazine compounds may impact a nuclear mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum

thesis
posted on 23.07.2019, 07:02 authored by KATHERINE MAY ELLIS
Malaria is a severe parasitic disease which claims over 400,000 lives annually. Drug resistance to the first line antimalarials is spreading and new medicines are desperately required. The research detailed in this thesis provides new information about the mechanism of action of the novel triazine antimalarials. It demonstrates the potent and rapid action of the compounds across the blood stages of the parasite life-cycle, and indicates a novel, nuclear related mechanism of action. This new mechanistic understanding will underpin the ongoing drug discovery efforts based on this novel class of antimalarial compounds.

History

Principal supervisor

Darren John Creek

Year of Award

2019

Department, School or Centre

Drug Delivery, Disposition and Dynamics

Course

Doctor of Philosophy

Degree Type

DOCTORATE

Faculty

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences