Walk the talk: the journey towards deconstructing the education environment as a model for anti-oppressive social and community welfare practice

2017-06-02T01:18:01Z (GMT) by Manning, Debra
As an experienced social welfare practitioner, two years spent living and working as a volunteer in Botswana forced me to reflect critically on my practice, but it was not until I returned that I recognised the pervasive power of our culture to oppress, most visibly, Indigenous Australians. That realisation has led me to focus on issues of power, racism and oppression in my social and community welfare teaching and I am endeavouring to develop a model of teaching that not only raises these issues and strategies to address them for practice but provides an educational environment that enables students to experience such a model. This paper examines the process of integrating my personal experience with my professional teaching and welfare practice and offers some ideas about how social and community welfare students might learn to be genuinely inclusive professional workers through their educational experience.